The Blogger Recognition Award

My deepest gratitude goes to Sarah at thepracticalhistorian for nominating my blog. If you do not follow her, please do. Her writing is both informative and witty. OK, so these are the rules to follow when you accept this award.

1) Write a post to display your award.

2) Give a brief story of how your blog started.

3) Give two pieces of advice for new bloggers.

4) Thank the person that nominated you and link to his or her blog.

5) Nominate 15 other bloggers.

Addressing in order:

November 14, 1970

fountain-2

Marshall University Memorial Fountain HistoryPresent

On this day, we, the daughters and the sons of Marshall, remember 75 people. These 75 people were football players, coaches, and trainers. They held positions in the Athletic Department. They were fans. They were members of a flight crew, a pilot, a co-pilot, a Charter Coordinator. Two were flight attendants. They were husbands and wives. They were parents. They were sons and daughters, brothers and sisters. These 75 people, are daughters and sons of Marshall.

Advocating Buncombe

condicamhist

History Present

Coincidence often fosters inspiration. A few days before I attended my umpteenth rally of this political season, I was given a gift. A near fifty-pound tome (a slight exaggeration) titled the Concise Dictionary of American History. Opening the book to a random page, I landed on an entry that brought several stark realities home. First, few political speeches rise above the rest. They are formulaic. Candidates acknowledge their supporters, identify the opposition, provide an anecdote designed to create a connection to the audience, and conclude with a call to civic duty. Second, the English language is changing fast. The particular entry on which I lit dealt with a word I rarely hear. Finally, I am getting older. With that comes a reluctance to abandon old things. After all, embracing today does not require erasing yesterday. If utilizing an old word contributes to the richness of a phrase, I am all for using it. This post is my attempt to dust off one such word (an effort that requires a little history).

Duesenberg-Milton Land Speed Record Car

If you are into cars, this is a great article.

Old Machine Press

By William Pearce

After winning the Elgin National Road Race, held in Elgin, Illinois on 23 August 1919, Duesenberg race car driver Tommy Milton began to focus on one of his top goals: establishing a new land speed record at Dayton Beach, Florida. The current record was held by Milton’s rival Ralph De Palma at 149.875 mph (241.001 km/h). Milton had been contemplating a land speed record (LSR) car for a long time. In December 1916, he and Fred Duesenberg entered into an agreement* to build a car to Milton’s specifications provided Milton would partially fund the vehicle. With his share of the Eglin winnings, Milton was one step closer to building the LSR car.

Duesenberg Milton LSR Indy Tommy Milton sits in the Duesenberg-Milton LSR car at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway (most likely in May 1920). The burnt paint on the engine cowl was a result of a fire during its speed runs…

View original post 2,140 more words

Grains of Truth- The 1940 Democratic Convention

grainsoftruth

Brews and Peruse: Examination of a historical document while drinking a craft beer. Consisting of three essential components:

1) The Document: Speeches of the 1940 Democratic Convention including Eleanor Roosevelt’s Address- Many people believe Franklin Roosevelt’s actions in acquiring the nomination were later justified when the U.S. entered World War II. However, political deception is still political deception…

2) The Beer: Grains of Truth from Ommegang Brewery- Why? Two reasons. First, both FDR and the beer are from New York. Second, well… there is the name. [My reactions to the beer are bold and bracketed]

3) My commentary: A tongue in cheek look at an American political event. My thoughts, no citations. (Italicized)

In 1940 Franklin Delano Roosevelt needed to make a decision. No previous U.S. president had achieved a third term. Only two, Theodore Roosevelt and US Grant had attempted to gain third terms, and both efforts were rejected. Believing that only he was qualified to lead the country at such a crucial time, FDR decided to run. However, gaining the Democrat Party nomination would present a challenge. Historical precedence indicated that Americans would once again reject someone desiring a third term, a reality necessitating Roosevelt’s apparent “recruitment” for the nomination.  Chicago hosted the 1940 Democrat Party Convention and real political theater began on the convention’s first night…

When Did Passenger Trains Begin to Run between New York City and Montreal?

Well researched, interesting history

PenneyVanderbilt

Image

It all started out with a question from a reader wondering if there was a railroad that went from New York City to Montreal circa 1855? He had some of John Stover’s books and with maps that show a line going from NYC to the Canadian border as early as 1850.  But it’s really not too clear and there is no text stating that.

Our reader found the answer – no direct line, but there was a line through Vermont that then crossed over to Rouses Point and connected up with the Plattsburgh to Montreal line that opened in 1852. Yup, that bridge eventually became part of the Rutland line to Ogdensburg, NY

The D&H at created a line from Albany / Troy to Rouses Point. Then they bought a subsidiary, Napier Junction Rwy, that got them into Montréal. Connections NYC to Albany were not in place 1855.

If you…

View original post 1,971 more words

Semi-Pro Football

1946hollywood-bears                 charlestonrockets

Hollywood Bears                                              Charleston Rockets

(www.oldestlivingprofootball.com)          (www.logoserver.com)

A couple gifts for a Sunday. A little history on two stadiums with important connections to Semi-Pro Football. Stadiums, leagues, teams, and players important to the history of the game.

Capital Stories… William F. Cody

buffalo_bill_cody_by_sarony_c1880William F. Cody (en.wikipedia.org)

Moral dilemmas frequently arise when investment meets conscience. Given human nature, it is likely that such crises have existed as long as humans have invested money in things unseen. A story from the book Capital Stories about Famous Americans, demonstrates that at least one person came to question such an investment after witnessing one of Buffalo Bill’s famous western exhibitions.