When Did Passenger Trains Begin to Run between New York City and Montreal?

Well researched, interesting history

PenneyVanderbilt

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It all started out with a question from a reader wondering if there was a railroad that went from New York City to Montreal circa 1855? He had some of John Stover’s books and with maps that show a line going from NYC to the Canadian border as early as 1850.  But it’s really not too clear and there is no text stating that.

Our reader found the answer – no direct line, but there was a line through Vermont that then crossed over to Rouses Point and connected up with the Plattsburgh to Montreal line that opened in 1852. Yup, that bridge eventually became part of the Rutland line to Ogdensburg, NY

The D&H at created a line from Albany / Troy to Rouses Point. Then they bought a subsidiary, Napier Junction Rwy, that got them into Montréal. Connections NYC to Albany were not in place 1855.

If you…

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The More noble..the more humble

Profound

Life in Japan

Now it’s the harvest season of rice.

Whenever I saw the rice at the field , it reminds me of this

実るほど 頭をたれる 稲穂かな

It means :

“The heavier the stock of rice, the more its head is lowed.”

“That boughs that bear most hang lowest.”

“The more noble the more humble.”

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When some people get thier power or “position” , they just show it off and snobby.. But the true respectable people never like that.

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Semi-Pro Football

1946hollywood-bears                 charlestonrockets

Hollywood Bears                                              Charleston Rockets

(www.oldestlivingprofootball.com)          (www.logoserver.com)

A couple gifts for a Sunday. A little history on two stadiums with important connections to Semi-Pro Football. Stadiums, leagues, teams, and players important to the history of the game.
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Capital Stories… William F. Cody

“Good Security”

buffalo_bill_cody_by_sarony_c1880William F. Cody (en.wikipedia.org)

Moral dilemmas frequently arise when investment meets conscience. Given human nature, it is likely that such crises have existed as long as humans have invested money in things unseen. A story from the book Capital Stories about Famous Americans, demonstrates that at least one person came to question such an investment after witnessing one of Buffalo Bill’s famous western exhibitions.
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A Post About Clio

clio-logo

Though often unrecognized, history constantly brushes against us. It is present in all the places we visit, in houses we walk past, and the roads on which we drive. Stored in libraries and archives the world over, these histories link people to place, but they are not easily accessible. Wireless devices allow us to access an incomprehensible amount of information, if we know what to enter in a search field. How can the history buff easily connect with the history around them? How can a football fan travelling through Portsmouth, OH, quickly discover the local stadium NFL Hall of Fame members once called home? If a naval enthusiast gassed up in Portsmouth, NH, how could they casually learn of William Badger’s 1800’s shipyard? Clio connects you with historic places, people, and events with which you are not familiar. It is free and simple to use.
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Book Review: West of the Revolution

An Uncommon History of 1776

Rarely, will I recommend a book with revisionist appeals. Claudio Saunt’s work, West of the Revolution, is such a book. As the title indicates, Saunt explores North American events contemporaneous to, but removed from, the American Revolution. Despite an appeal to modern revisionist belief, it is an enjoyable and informative read of 211 pages.
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Capital Stories… Winston Churchill (the author)

“Light on the Literary Life”

It is a dose of personal choice, and a quirk of history, that ushered a highly successful American novelist of the late 18th and early 19th Centuries into near obscurity. Winston Churchill authored several best-sellers by 1904, but later chose to pursue other interests. Churchill entered politics, took up painting, and eventually left the public eye. His name provided the quirk of history. His withdraw coincided with a different Winston Churchill’s rise to prominence. Our memory of the British politician turned author is so large that our memory of the American author turned politician is now faint.

The following story features Winston Churchill, the American author. It is one story featured in the book, Capital Stories About Famous Americans.
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