New Blog: M.B. Henry

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MBHenry

Hey Folks,

Check out this new blog: MB Henry: Following the Path to The Past

History is the theme. MB Henry creates excellent histories, the articles are interesting and the writing is great. Please give her site a look and, please follow. These are links to her first two posts:

The Angel of Marye’s Heights

Etches In Stone

 

 

 

(7/20)Welcome to Okayama Japan, the Land of Sunshine!

Hello folks, I know many of you already follow “Samurai Japan” (Ryoma Sakamoto) but if you do not, you should. This blog provides an excellent window into Japan; the people, the history, the culture. I hope you enjoy this piece and that you will follow “Samurai Japan.”

Samurai Japan

Ceramic Treasures – Bizen-yaki, Okayama Prefecture [1080p HD]

Today: Bizen-yaki, Okayama Prefecture. We will visit the potters from all over Japan and discover their ceramics heritage by introducing the culture and historical background.

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Travel: St. Joseph, MI (Food & Drink)

St Joseph State Street
State Street St. Joseph, MI

This post is the second on the town of St. Joseph, MI. As I noted in the previous post, “St. Joseph, MI (History)”, I went for business while Mrs. Present went to relax. St. Joseph is very nice town and we thoroughly enjoyed our time there. Obviously, the tourist season for beach towns on Lake Michigan’s shore is short. Fortunately, St. Joseph’s tourist area is small and easily walked. Most restaurants and shops located between Silver Beach, the St. Joseph River, Market and Court Streets. A horse drawn wagon and bicycles are available if you want a break from walking.
Continue reading “Travel: St. Joseph, MI (Food & Drink)”

St. Joseph, MI (History)

Lighthouse
St Joseph, MI North Pier Lighthouse

Back in June, I made a business trip to St. Joseph, MI. Since I had never been to St. Joseph, I checked it out before I left. What a great little town! There are many things to do, both in St. Joseph, and in the immediate area. The town boasts an Art Museum, a Children’s Museum, a lakefront beach, a beach park, and a vibrant food and drink culture. St. Joseph’s beachfront, restaurant, and shopping area is concentrated in a small area. Everything is easily within walking distance.

After I shared what I had learned, Mrs. Present decided to accompany me. We left a few days early so we could experience the town together. Once I began my work schedule, Mrs. Present was forced to sit on the beach, eat real ice cream, and read books. Poor her! St. Joseph is a town that firmly embraces its history. Placed smartly long the narrow park that rests between Lake Boulevard and the bluff that hangs above Lake Michigan’s shore, are Memorials to area citizens that gave their lives in service.

Continue reading “St. Joseph, MI (History)”

Prince Mongo’s Castle

I am drawn to this blog… fascinated at the things we abandon. What was it like when the last person to use these spaces walked out?

Abandoned Southeast

Prince Mongo’s Castle, also known as Ashlar Hall, is a mock castle in Memphis.  After Robert Brinkley Snowden graduated from Princeton in 1890, he decided to return to his hometown to design and construct his family estate. Snowden, a prominent real estate developer, completed Ashlar Hall in 1896.

Ashlar HallThe 11,000 square foot home has two floors with 8 rooms plus a full basement and a large attic with servants’ quarters. An irregular shaped swimming pool is located outside, southwest of the house. The Snowden property stretched for 3,000 acres, well into Mississippi. The final cost for construction was around $25,000, roughly equivalent to $725,000 today.

Ashlar Hall

Snowden’s great-grandfather, Col. Robert C. Brinkley started the Peabody Hotel several years prior. The Snowden family was considered Memphis royalty by the early 1900s and Brinkley Snowden was considered one of the premier real estate developers. The mansion was named Ashlar Hall due to it being almost entirely constructed of Ashlar Stone which was brought to town on barges. The past few decades have not been…

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Book Review: The Heart of Everything That Is

Red Cloud

Bob Drury and Tom Clavin, The Heart of Everything That Is: The Untold Story of Red Cloud, An American Legend. (New York, NY: Simon & Schuster Paperbacks, 2013).

On Christmas night 1866, a man rode into Fort Laramie. Near death from riding 236 miles in four days, through a blizzard, Portugee Phillips completed his mission. Phillips delivered dispatches from Colonel Henry Carrington, the commander of Ft Phil Kearny. The news was shocking. Days earlier, on December 21st, warriors from several Indian tribes staged a coordinated assault that annihilated a unit from the US Army. “Fetterman’s Massacre” marked the first time the United States military lost to a Native force.

In their book, The Heart of Everything That Is, authors Bob Drury and Tom Clavin provide an excellent work of history. Red Cloud, the Sioux Chief who orchestrated Captain Fetterman’s stunning defeat, is the book’s subject. Opening a window to humanity in the old west, Red Cloud’s story is told in vivid narrative. Continue reading “Book Review: The Heart of Everything That Is”