The Author

There were forty-nine states in the Union in March of 1959. My personage is nearly five months older than Hawaii’s statehood and, had my parents been more industrious, I may have beaten Alaska. Idealism and I flirted with each other during the 1970’s. A typical American family, in a typical American community, with typically American schools. Four topics always fascinated me history, geography, religion, and politics. Basically, most things connected to people, places and ideas. High School was great, and I made many friends. A brief stint in the Political Science Department at Marshall University, three semesters from 1977 to 1979, saw me produce ten hours of meaningful credits before I left school.

Reality and I became acquainted during the 1980’s and beyond. Jobs and careers, a wife, two children, and a grand-daughter.

Although my formal education had ended, I never stopped indulging my fascination with those four topics. Concerning religion, fulfillment comes from studying historic and theological works of Catholic, Orthodox, and Protestant Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. I am a Christian. With the passing of time, my thoughts concerning history, geography, and politics changed. Human geography now dominates over classical geography. History is my passion, but as I read newer books, I became troubled. Monumental shifts have taken place in field of history. New political philosophies require new historiographies. Liberal and Progressive ideologies moved beyond the concept of nation and embraced a specific brand of globalism. A specific globalism that rooted itself, almost to a sub-conscience level, into the mainstream world of politics. Though most of the works that produced these changes predate 1980, their influence has risen steadily since 1980. At least that is when I began to notice. Most works of history written today do not resemble the history I love. Many of the historical, geographical, and political, and theological works produced today are written to support that specific brand of global Progressive ideology.

History is powerful. It possesses an inherent utility. Many great civilizations evolved supportive histories which bound their peoples together, while also providing a both a direction and a sense of distinction. That is why most “isms” develop their own historiography. Marxism’s belief that human development is a story of class struggle is one example of an “ism” historiography. Communism’s historiography propelled the ideology. History has long been subject to this, but now even social movements develop specific historiographies. When ideology or politics informs your history, you produce propaganda. History should inform ideology and politics.

As soon as my youngest child left for college, I returned to school. At 52 years of age I re-enrolled at Marshall University. I finally graduated in 2016 with a B.A. in History, at the ripe old age of 57. HISTORY PRESENT is the fulfillment of a dream. After much hard work and a great deal of help from family, professors, and friends it is a reality. My desire is to produce informative works of history that people will also enjoy.