An Introduction- The History of My Times: According to Me

This post serves as an introduction to a new project. Importantly, the blog title “History Present” and the address (historypresent.com) will remain. This project fits squarely with the ideas that led me to start the blog. So…
What is it about? See the title. Who am I? A good place to start answering that question is found at this bog’s “About” page. When, exactly, are my times? From when I was born until now. More to follow.
How will it look? After collecting my scattered thoughts, and with a few minutes consideration, I settled on the following format. “Settled on” is to decisive a phrase. “Going with for now” is more accurate. Posts associated with this project will carry the title The History of My Times: According to Me. My thought is to create both a The History of My Times page (not sure) and category (certain). Each entry in the series will carry a subtitle reflecting that post’s subject matter. Example subject matters may feature the following subtitles: “The Cold War” or, “Cold Cuts.” To make searching easier, the post subtitle will appear above project title. While some subtitles may play at their given subject matters, I promise they will pertain to the subject matter. My intention is to deliver a serious history, mostly. Why deliver a serious history? Because I am not very funny.
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Review: Presidential Wit and Wisdom

I was recently gifted this brilliant little book, a great quick read, containing selected quotes of various U.S. presidents. This book would be the perfect gift for any person interested in U.S. history.

Here are two selections from James Madison and a bonus track from William Henry Harrison.
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Travel: Charlottesville, VA

Part 1: James Monroe’s Highland

With only a few days available for a get-away, Mrs. Present and I made a trip to Charlottesville, VA. Forced into a late booking, we choose the Sleep Inn and Suites Monticello. Our room was well priced, clean, and provided the requisite comfort for a one-night stay. The staff was friendly, and the complimentary continental breakfast was satisfying. Not having time to research local eateries before we arrived, we welcomed the recommendations offered by the Front Desk staff. Their recommendations for lunch and dinner proved exceptional.

We planned to visit three sites. James Monroe’s Highland, Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello, and James Madison’s Montpelier. Because of the volume of information associated with each site, I will break the trip into three parts. [Day 1] Part 1: Monroe’s Highland and lunch. Part 2: Jefferson’s Monticello and dinner. [Day 2] Part 3: Madison’s Montpelier and lunch.

Part 1: James Monroe’s Highland
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Capital Stories… William F. Cody

“Good Security”

buffalo_bill_cody_by_sarony_c1880William F. Cody (en.wikipedia.org)

Moral dilemmas frequently arise when investment meets conscience. Given human nature, it is likely that such crises have existed as long as humans have invested money in things unseen. A story from the book Capital Stories about Famous Americans, demonstrates that at least one person came to question such an investment after witnessing one of Buffalo Bill’s famous western exhibitions.
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A Post About Clio

clio-logo

Though often unrecognized, history constantly brushes against us. It is present in all the places we visit, in houses we walk past, and the roads on which we drive. Stored in libraries and archives the world over, these histories link people to place, but they are not easily accessible. Wireless devices allow us to access an incomprehensible amount of information, if we know what to enter in a search field. How can the history buff easily connect with the history around them? How can a football fan travelling through Portsmouth, OH, quickly discover the local stadium NFL Hall of Fame members once called home? If a naval enthusiast gassed up in Portsmouth, NH, how could they casually learn of William Badger’s 1800’s shipyard? Clio connects you with historic places, people, and events with which you are not familiar. It is free and simple to use.
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Capital Stories… Ben Franklin

“A Lesson in Time Value”

After browsing around for quite some time, a particularly obstinate patron at Ben Franklin’s book store refused to accept the price offered by a store clerk. Certain that speaking to the owner would obtain him a better price, the man demanded the clerk summon the proprietor. Franklin’s newspaper operation was located in the bookstore’s backroom, and the patron’s summons dragged Franklin from working at the press. Upon Franklin’s arrival the man asked “What is the lowest price you can take for this book, sir?” In an effort to teach the man to value the time of others, Ben Franklin entered the bargaining session. Continue reading “Capital Stories… Ben Franklin”

The Clintonian Platform

Federalist Party Platform of 1812 (Sort of…)

Brews and Peruse: Examination of a historical document while drinking a craft beer. For a more full description, see Brews & Peruse page. Consists of three essential components:

1) The Document: The Clintonian Platform*– Why? It will be fun… trust me. (Indented)

*The Federalist Party Platform of 1812 ( Federalists did not actually nominate their own presidential candidate in 1812, they supported the candidacy of the Federalist leaning DeWitt Clinton. That is why the document is known as the Clintonian Platform.)

2) The Beer: Sam’l Smith Organic, Handcrafted, Raspberry Fruit Ale: Why? You will see. Each sip and my reaction to it are noted in [BRACKETS-].

3) My commentary: A tongue in cheek look at an American political event. My thoughts, no citations. (Italicized)
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